Author

Ken Masugi

Ken Masugi is a senior fellow of the Claremont Institute.

 

Dr. Masugi has extensive experience in government and academia. Following his initial appointment at the Claremont Institute (1982-86), he was a special assistant to then-Chairman Clarence Thomas of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (1986-1990). After his years in Washington, he held visiting university appointments at James Madison College of Michigan State University and the Ashbrook Center of Ashland University. He was John M. Olin Distinguished Visiting Professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

With Brian Janiskee, Dr. Masugi is co-author of Democracy in California: Politics and Government in the Golden State (Rowman & Littlefield, 2004) and co-editor of The California Republic: Institutions, Statemanship, and Policies (Rowman & Littlefield, 2004). He is co-editor of seven other books on American politics and political thought. His current book project is a work on citizenship and multiculturalism, which uses the standards of the American Founding to critique the comtemporary attack on a common citizenship.

He is the author of numerous essays and reviews of works on political theory, constitutional law, public policy, and films. Dr. Masugi has also published in the popular press, including the Los Angeles Times, Orange County Register, Washington Post, Washington Times, National Review, and the Weekly Standard. He also sits on the editorial boards of Perspectives on Political Science and Interpretation.

Articles by Ken Masugi

To Save the Union

To Save the Union

Lincoln’s statesmanship countenanced the less perfect in pursuit of the more perfect.
There Are No Safe Spaces

There Are No Safe Spaces

The current CMC Administration is hell-bent to turn a preeminent liberal arts college into a reeducation camp.
Lukewarm Lincoln

Lukewarm Lincoln

Students of Abraham Lincoln marvel that, when not quite 29, he warned of a towering genius...
Of Neo-Cons and Dons

Of Neo-Cons and Dons

Drucker, Adler, and Rorty each make some contribution toward combating the prevalent relativism of contemporary scholarly thought but nonetheless fail to seriously consider the place of splendor in the way we live our lives.
Renewing the Republic and Republicans

Renewing the Republic and Republicans

Abraham Lincoln was not only our greatest rhetorician and statesman, but a man who understood and encouraged abundant economic opportunity, writes Ken Masugi
Did Tocqueville Understand America?

Did Tocqueville Understand America?

In this egalitarian age, Mansfield and Winthrop want to convey the book's salutary teachings for democracy but also to keep Tocqueville safe for an aristocracy of readers and thus do their part in fostering an aristocratic world within democracy.
Volume XX, Number 3, Summer 2020

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